Helen Broms Sandberg, Unlocking Passages

Helen Broms Sandberg, Unlocking Passages, 2011, image: Kulturhuset

A dual video projection displaying the fantastical world of Queen Christina Alexandra (1626-1689) as imagined by a confined writer who suffers from amnesia is coupled with an unhindered view into this same writer’s personal, imprisoned space. More »

”The Spiral and the Square. Exercises in translatability”

Laura Lima, Marra, 1996-2011, image: Olle Kirchmeier

“The Spiral and the Square” is one exhibition, curated by Daniela Castro and Jochen Volz, which is part of a larger project initiated so as to approach the issues of translation and translatability of other places from a primarily Swedish perspective—beginning with a close-up on Brazilian culture. More »

Juan-Pedro Fabra Guemberena, ”YANKEE GO HOME! but please take me with you”

Juan-Pedro Fabra Guemberena, Black Madonnas, 2011, image: Nordin Gallery

Far from neutral, the new works in Juan-Pedro Fabra Guemberena’s exhibition “YANKEE GO HOME! but please take me with you” favor extreme positions. More »

Ragnar Persson, När Mörkret Faller

Ragnar Persson
Ragnar Persson, När Mörkret Faller, 2011, image: Gallery Steinsland Berliner

In Ragnar Persson’s När Mörkret Faller/When Darkness Falls, 2011, the artist devises a roaming pack of wild dogs or wolves alongside an equally untamed coterie of human beings—long-haired, solitary, holding piercing gazes—in a northern forest populated with somewhat secretive animals: falcons, snakes and nocturnal creatures. More »

Björn Kjelltoft, ”I Promise, I Will Never Be Your Friend. No Matter What, Ever…”

Björn Kjelltoft
Björn Kjelltoft, 2011, image: Gallery Niklas Belenius

White, billowing curtains display seemingly banal yet biting phrases appropriated from a disheartened couple’s filmic encounter in their hotel room. More »

Bryan Graf, ”Wildlife Analysis”

Bryan Graf
Bryan Graf, Butterfly #2, 2008, image: Bryan Graf

The repetition as it stands seems necessary, yet these images do not seem replaceable. So as to preserve a feeling or moment, people return to it and repeat to affirm its significance or exclusivity. Yet that which is cherished cannot be repeated. More »

Peter Ern, Electric Light

Peter Ern
Peter Ern, Electric Light, 2011, image: Peter Bergman

Peter Ern’s solo exhibition “A Place Called Home” displays new, large scale paintings predominantly focused on dry or wintry landscapes which many could argue are devoid of a detectable action or livelihood, as well as others drawing attention to the commonplace, external architectures of Sweden―Soviet-style apartment complexes, tucked away stugas/country houses, kojans/huts in the woods or inner, industrial spaces such as in Ern’s Electric Light, 2011. If Ern’s “A Place Called Home” is approached as a series, Electric Light, 2011 doesn’t follow suit as comfortably as the others, bringing the viewer inside an abandoned space in contrast. More »

Gardar Eide Einarsson, ”Power Has a Fragrance”

Gardar Eide Einarsson
Gardar Eide Einarsson, Caligula, 2010, image: Mattias Givell

Norwegian artist Gardar Eide Einarsson’s major solo exhibition at Bonniers Konsthall, titled “Power Has a Fragrance,” marks the first time his work has been shown in Sweden. Einarsson is well aware that––as a formally trained artist often given the opportunity to display work in museum settings––he produces art from a position of privilege, and he does not shy away from criticizing his own creative role within artistic institutions. More »

Dan Holdsworth, ”Blackout”

Dan Holdsworth
Dan Holdsworth, Blackout 09, 2010, image: Dan Holdsworth

Dan Holdsworth’s twist on landscape photography is introduced to Sweden, a country well-versed in climatic extremes. Nordin, a niche gallery established in 2007, accentuates a cluster of Holdsworth’s prints of enormous proportions, depositing one particular set apart from the others—back-lit in a smaller, adjacent room most likely meant for video installations. Claiming that inspiration for this series came from New York’s power failures of the 1960s, Holdsworth in ”Blackout” reminds the viewer that certain flavors of panic and unrest are cyclical—one keen emotion present yesterday, perhaps back again today. More »