Ragnar Persson, När Mörkret Faller

Ragnar Persson
Ragnar Persson, När Mörkret Faller, 2011, image: Gallery Steinsland Berliner

In Ragnar Persson’s När Mörkret Faller/When Darkness Falls, 2011, the artist devises a roaming pack of wild dogs or wolves alongside an equally untamed coterie of human beings—long-haired, solitary, holding piercing gazes—in a northern forest populated with somewhat secretive animals: falcons, snakes and nocturnal creatures. The scene is also randomly littered with red lightning bolts scratched into view, a teepee, empty wooden chairs and leafless trees indicating autumn or early spring. But: why is this highlighted scene important to someone who is not a part of it? Why are the individuals turned towards the viewer in this confrontational manner? What do these entities expect or desire from those who watch them, and what will become of this view? A view which appears to be waiting for the unexpected; it stands to want from the outside or unknown.

Persson’s appeal may be the fact that each of his framed drawings is a snapshot into a more distinctive narrative that one hopes to be either directly a part of or allowed to gaze upon as a voyeur. Persson embraces an experimental, fantastical quality; this searching trait can be found in the visages of the spectral characters present in his work. They either look directly at the viewer—glassy-eyed, vapid or in contrast, intense—or they stare past the viewer and off into a peripheral netherland. Persson often limits himself to black & white or charcoal shades, choosing to add color when an absolute necessity. The decision seems indicative of Persson’s overall creative approach: to make out of raw necessity is more genuine than to make for other reasons. The artist emphasizes an alternative spiritualism with occultish threads of influence, and the rapport between and among animals and people in his images are finely orchestrated. His characters can seem to be pensive, modern-day pastoral philosophers possessing ideas worth unraveling. Relationships between present characters in När Mörkret Faller/When Darkness Falls may at first be off-putting, yet on second glance, they appear friendly in that way an unexpected stranger becomes after you abandon reserve.To see the review in context, click here.

Johannes Heldén, “The Exploding Book”

Johannes Heldén
Johannes Heldén, Clouds, 2017.

As one enters the space temporarily designated for Swedish artist and poet Johannes Heldén’s The Exploding Book at Konstakademin’s in Stockholm, one detects that Heldén is receptive to nuance; each creative gesture confirms his dedication to both text and image, expressed with equitable consideration. More »

Malin Gabriella Nordin, “Floating from Within”

Malin Gabriella Nordin, Veil of Dreams, 2017. Image: Gallery Steinsland Berliner.

Stockholm-based artist Malin Gabriella Nordin is one of many Swedish women artists who resort to the basics – or perhaps the old ways, meaning they’re not particularly interested in the digital. More »

“Survival Kit 9”

Andris Eglītis, Laboratory of Poetic Research, 2017. Image: Jacquelyn Davis.

The 9th edition of Survival Kit is orchestrated by a small team of Baltic and Scandinavian curators: Jonatan Habib Engqvist, Solvita Krese and Inga Lāce. All possess a background in organizing independently and within the confines of institutions, which may be their strong point—their fluidity. More »

The 9th Momentum Biennial

Jenna Sutela, Sporulating Paragraph, 2017. Image: Momentum 9.

Momentum 9, taking place in the industrial town of Moss, Norway, is being curated by Ulrika Flink, Ilari Laamanen, Jacob Lillemose, Gunhild Moe, and Jón B.K. Ransu, who together represent the Scandinavian region. With this biennial’s focus on ‘alienation’, the curators joined forces to determine how alien processes and entities are infused in our lives through technological, ecological and social transformations. More »

Klas Eriksson, “Vet din mamma var du e?”

Klas Eriksson
Klas Eriksson, Evidence of Patchwork, 2017. Image: Göteborgs Konsthall.

Swedish artist Klas Eriksson has developed a practice rooted in examining subcultures via works in public spaces and spontaneous performances. With an interest in how power flows and how crowds function, the artist attempts to unpack sociopolitical dynamics using playful tactics. More »

Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »


Magdalena Dziurlikowska, Corona Radiata, 2016. Image: Gotlands Konstmuseum.

Differentiating between public and private spheres can be challenging. This group exhibition focuses on how one might successfully share a subjective experience when most individuals are conditioned to distance themselves from others. More »