Camilla Løw, “Nerves and Muscles”

Camilla Løw
Camilla Løw, Heavy Water, 2015. Image: Carl Henrik Tillberg.

In Norwegian artist Camilla Løw’s fourth solo exhibition, “Nerves and Muscles,” the sculptures appear to be playful jaunts, but they are quite sophisticated in terms of their placement and distinct design. The simplest impression is not always synonymous with the easiest or less complex of choices, rather it’s the less visually complex path that often harbors deeper meaning otherwise undetected. There is a peculiar triad of creative directions present in this show: One trajectory involves towerlike beams that either are white-washed or incorporate vibrant colors, as in Synthetic (all works 2015). Other sculptural prints, which could surely stand as a series, hang from the ceiling as do most pieces here. These are spray-painted two-sided sheets of Perspex sporting floating clusters of hardware tools, such as in Heavy Water. A third variety of sculptures are large forms made from wire—one such is the outline of a hand dangling by a cord and titled Citizens (Blue). These three bodies of work complement one another, giving weight to the exhibition’s title referring to organic pathways where blood and neurological signals freely comingle.

This collection of pieces appeals to the eye with its emphasis on primary colors, geometric symmetry, and a spirited interaction between materials. The positioning of works in the space is as if the artist has prepared a stage for a performance—but for objects instead of humans. One can here depend upon the imagination to ignite intellect and emotion.

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Klas Eriksson, “Vet din mamma var du e?”

Klas Eriksson
Klas Eriksson, Evidence of Patchwork, 2017.

Swedish artist Klas Eriksson has developed a practice rooted in examining subcultures via works in public spaces and spontaneous performances. With an interest in how power flows and how crowds function, the artist attempts to unpack sociopolitical dynamics using playful tactics. More »

Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »

“Personal”

Dziurlikowska
Magdalena Dziurlikowska, Corona Radiata, 2016. Image: Gotlands Konstmuseum.

Differentiating between public and private spheres can be challenging. This group exhibition focuses on how one might successfully share a subjective experience when most individuals are conditioned to distance themselves from others. More »

Christine Ödlund, “Aether & Einstein”

Christine Ödlund
Christine Ödlund, Urtica Dioica, 2013. Image: Magasin III.

In a delicate fusion of scientific experimentation, metaphysics, and exchange between human beings and plants, Swedish artist Christine Ödlund provides an enchanting display of paintings, drawings, videos, and an organic installation that entices viewers to reconsider their relationships with both secular and spiritual realms. More »

Max Ronnersjö, Untitled (% work)

Max Ronnersjö
Max Ronnersjö, Untitled, 2014. Image: Max Ronnersjö

A Symbol Is As a Symbol Does

Now hangs Swedish artist Max Ronnersjö’s large-scale, percent (%) painting in my apartment—as if one shops for ½ priced boots or a practical winter coat this spring. More »

Bjarne Melgaard, “Right Here, Right Now”

Bjarne Melgaard
Bjarne Melgaard, Untitled, 2015. Image: Lars Bohman Gallery.

In “Right Here, Right Now,” Bjarne Melgaard’s impressive new exhibition of paintings and drawings at Lars Bohman Gallery in Stockholm, the artist courageously maps out and shares his psyche, conveying an array of mental states, from neurosis to obsession to disappointment. More »

Olafur Eliasson, “Reality Machines”

Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson, Beauty, 1993. Image: Anders Sune Berg.

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson’s exhibition “Reality Machines” serves as both a retrospective, including almost twenty key pieces from across his career, and a successful display of the modernist cohesion between art, architecture, and design. More »