David Maljkovic, ”New Reproductions”

David Maljković
David Maljković, view of New Reproductions, 2013. Image: Contemporary Art Centre.

Boredom and unnecessary repetition are looming threats for any contemporary artist or astute curator. Croatian artist David Maljković’s current solo exhibition, in a location that purports to be the largest exhibition space in the Baltic region (nearly 26,000 square feet), attracts attention due to the artist’s decision to reassess his previous projects with an emphasis on altering perception. The same exhibition space hosts an extensive Fluxus archive highlighting the creative efforts of Lithuanian-born American artist George Maciunas. The newly revisited work by Maljković appears linked to and influenced by Lithuania’s international avant-garde 1960s Fluxus movement, whose name originates from the Latin variant meaning “flow, flux, flowing, fluid.” The six new readings, which are displayed as slide projections, animations, complementary sculptures, and seemingly arbitrary objects, are not static; their colorful reflections and ripples are exhibited with grace, beckoning curiosity.

New Reproductions, 2013, displays overlapping images from previous works in a series of five collaged posters. Afterform, 2013, provides cartoon animations appropriated from a 1960s Croatian architectural magazine alongside Maljković’s earlier works that are projected onto a white screen. Both works, in addition to After the Fair, 2009 (tarpaulin and reflector incorporated in a tinkering, sculptural fashion), question ways in which artists relate to bricolage as well as relevant methods utilized in conventional, retrospective exhibitions. To a degree, the artist adopts the role of curator in his decision to consciously redesign previous works as new versions; content itself is recycled and realigned, yet harbors similar components. In this instance, the standardized positions of artist (David Maljković) and curator (Jurga Daubaraitė) bleed into each other, possibly in tribute to Fluxus. Depending on how one interacts with the works, any chosen quizzical narrative takes precedence over another—sometimes fragmented and interrupted and other times linear and consequential. An observer’s comfortable tendency to see in only one way limits the viewer and the viewed; in a fashion akin to how one reconsiders memories, over time the reality of any incident may become warped. “New Reproductions” is an invitation to avoid pretense and self-confidence. The world contradicts itself—especially, when one trusts perception alone.

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Johannes Heldén, “The Exploding Book”

Johannes Heldén
Johannes Heldén, Clouds, 2017.

As one enters the space temporarily designated for Swedish artist and poet Johannes Heldén’s The Exploding Book at Konstakademin’s in Stockholm, one detects that Heldén is receptive to nuance; each creative gesture confirms his dedication to both text and image, expressed with equitable consideration. More »

Malin Gabriella Nordin, “Floating from Within”

Malin Gabriella Nordin, Veil of Dreams, 2017. Image: Gallery Steinsland Berliner.

Stockholm-based artist Malin Gabriella Nordin is one of many Swedish women artists who resort to the basics – or perhaps the old ways, meaning they’re not particularly interested in the digital. More »

“Survival Kit 9”

Andris Eglītis, Laboratory of Poetic Research, 2017. Image: Jacquelyn Davis.

The 9th edition of Survival Kit is orchestrated by a small team of Baltic and Scandinavian curators: Jonatan Habib Engqvist, Solvita Krese and Inga Lāce. All possess a background in organizing independently and within the confines of institutions, which may be their strong point—their fluidity. More »

The 9th Momentum Biennial

Jenna Sutela, Sporulating Paragraph, 2017. Image: Momentum 9.

Momentum 9, taking place in the industrial town of Moss, Norway, is being curated by Ulrika Flink, Ilari Laamanen, Jacob Lillemose, Gunhild Moe, and Jón B.K. Ransu, who together represent the Scandinavian region. With this biennial’s focus on ‘alienation’, the curators joined forces to determine how alien processes and entities are infused in our lives through technological, ecological and social transformations. More »

Klas Eriksson, “Vet din mamma var du e?”

Klas Eriksson
Klas Eriksson, Evidence of Patchwork, 2017. Image: Göteborgs Konsthall.

Swedish artist Klas Eriksson has developed a practice rooted in examining subcultures via works in public spaces and spontaneous performances. With an interest in how power flows and how crowds function, the artist attempts to unpack sociopolitical dynamics using playful tactics. More »

Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »


Magdalena Dziurlikowska, Corona Radiata, 2016. Image: Gotlands Konstmuseum.

Differentiating between public and private spheres can be challenging. This group exhibition focuses on how one might successfully share a subjective experience when most individuals are conditioned to distance themselves from others. More »