Michael Manning, “Wild Fusion, VOL. III: WWWHATWWWEDOISSECRET”

Michael Manning
Michael Manning, Wokked Chinese Long Beans with Chicharrones, 2014. Image: Isbrytaren.

For his solo debut, Los Angeles–based artist Michael Manning presents large-scale paintings, videos, and installations that revolve around his interest in punk counterculture movements and their rapport with “reactionary network politics,” which use the Internet as medium. One initially encounters a wreath of blue hyacinths, in part paying homage to Darby Crash’s suicide (from the California punk band The Germs). The artist’s mélange of “trill” abstraction—including vibrant colors digitally printed onto nylon, as in Wild Salmon and Salted Avocado Hecado, 2014, which is displayed across the main floor alongside others such as the media piece Curry Swordfish and Passionfruit, 2014—pushes one to abandon safer interpretations that stem from viewing art at face value instead of considering the interplay between text, image, and communication outlets.

Wokked Chinese Long Beans with Chicharrones
, 2014, displays the actress Kristen Stewart caught by the paparazzi and marked with a blue circle (similar to The Germs’ logo), while Lobster Boniato Mash, 2014, reads “DARK DATA,” accompanying an image of NSA’s Data Center. Both are digital prints on film backlit by LEDs and instances of what the Internet offers as fodder for “post-Internet” JPEG creators—the touchscreen and DPI-obsessed. The exhibition title, “Wild Fusion, VOL. III: WWWHATWWWEDOISSECRET,” is reminiscent of a song by the aforementioned band; a punk-inspired approach is also used in Manning’s exhibition text consisting of song quotes, Tweets, and clipped confessionals. Is it useful to ask: What criteria are now required to be “punk”—or political at best?

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“Survival Kit 9”

Andris Eglītis, Laboratory of Poetic Research, 2017. Image: Jacquelyn Davis.

The 9th edition of Survival Kit is orchestrated by a small team of Baltic and Scandinavian curators: Jonatan Habib Engqvist, Solvita Krese and Inga Lāce. All possess a background in organizing independently and within the confines of institutions, which may be their strong point—their fluidity. More »

The 9th Momentum Biennial

Jenna Sutela, Sporulating Paragraph, 2017. Image: Momentum 9.

Momentum 9, taking place in the industrial town of Moss, Norway, is being curated by Ulrika Flink, Ilari Laamanen, Jacob Lillemose, Gunhild Moe, and Jón B.K. Ransu, who together represent the Scandinavian region. With this biennial’s focus on ‘alienation’, the curators joined forces to determine how alien processes and entities are infused in our lives through technological, ecological and social transformations. More »

Klas Eriksson, “Vet din mamma var du e?”

Klas Eriksson
Klas Eriksson, Evidence of Patchwork, 2017. Image: Göteborgs Konsthall.

Swedish artist Klas Eriksson has developed a practice rooted in examining subcultures via works in public spaces and spontaneous performances. With an interest in how power flows and how crowds function, the artist attempts to unpack sociopolitical dynamics using playful tactics. More »

Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »

“Personal”

Dziurlikowska
Magdalena Dziurlikowska, Corona Radiata, 2016. Image: Gotlands Konstmuseum.

Differentiating between public and private spheres can be challenging. This group exhibition focuses on how one might successfully share a subjective experience when most individuals are conditioned to distance themselves from others. More »

Christine Ödlund, “Aether & Einstein”

Christine Ödlund
Christine Ödlund, Urtica Dioica, 2013. Image: Magasin III.

In a delicate fusion of scientific experimentation, metaphysics, and exchange between human beings and plants, Swedish artist Christine Ödlund provides an enchanting display of paintings, drawings, videos, and an organic installation that entices viewers to reconsider their relationships with both secular and spiritual realms. More »

Max Ronnersjö, Untitled (% work)

Max Ronnersjö
Max Ronnersjö, Untitled, 2014. Image: Max Ronnersjö

A Symbol Is As a Symbol Does

Now hangs Swedish artist Max Ronnersjö’s large-scale, percent (%) painting in my apartment—as if one shops for ½ priced boots or a practical winter coat this spring. More »