Ofer Wolberger, “Nein”

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Ofer Wolberger, Nein, 2013-2015. Image: Stene Projects.

Ofer Wolberger’s first exhibition in Scandinavia, titled “Nein,” displays works ripe from the artist’s teenage inexperience. Wolberger refuses to show any signs of an original gesture with this collection of paintings, for one of which he appropriates the titular image of Dopey, 2015. The singular, doe-eyed cartoon dwarf is borrowed both from Walt Disney’s and Adolf Hitler’s supposed sketches of the character—as the press release states—emphasizing the difficulty of verifying an image’s origin, as well as the murky ethics of some creativity. The paintings appear childish and playful, as in the panorama of Landscape, 2015, where grass-green mountains compliment a cartoonish, royal-blue sky, or in Pinocchio I–III, 2015, where the iconic boy-puppet is exhibited in a vibrant triptych. Upon closer examination, these works seem to vacillate between a sense of emasculation and of a severe overcompensation of masculine symbols throughout. For instance, Pinocchio’s nose is a phallus; a black rod lashes across the canvas in Nein, 2013–2015; and in a juvenile sketch of a skewed man titled Childhood Drawing, 2015, an oversized sexual organ projects toward some unseen target.

The artist’s pieces accentuate frivolity, yet one may easily glimpse a darker, less obvious humor that exists below the surface of each displayed gesture. Adulthood is never too far from any given childhood, and these works highlight how fragile the division between comedy and tragedy remains. By drawing attention to the harsh reality of failure and misconception, the delusions that many embrace during their formative years may crumble over time with each blow or negotiation as they approach maturity.

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Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »

“Personal”

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Magdalena Dziurlikowska, Corona Radiata, 2016. Image: Gotlands Konstmuseum.

Differentiating between public and private spheres can be challenging. This group exhibition focuses on how one might successfully share a subjective experience when most individuals are conditioned to distance themselves from others. More »

Christine Ödlund, “Aether & Einstein”

Christine Ödlund
Christine Ödlund, Urtica Dioica, 2013. Image: Magasin III.

In a delicate fusion of scientific experimentation, metaphysics, and exchange between human beings and plants, Swedish artist Christine Ödlund provides an enchanting display of paintings, drawings, videos, and an organic installation that entices viewers to reconsider their relationships with both secular and spiritual realms. More »

Max Ronnersjö, Untitled (% work)

Max Ronnersjö
Max Ronnersjö, Untitled, 2014. Image: Max Ronnersjö

A Symbol Is As a Symbol Does

Now hangs Swedish artist Max Ronnersjö’s large-scale, percent (%) painting in my apartment—as if one shops for ½ priced boots or a practical winter coat this spring. More »

Bjarne Melgaard, “Right Here, Right Now”

Bjarne Melgaard
Bjarne Melgaard, Untitled, 2015. Image: Lars Bohman Gallery.

In “Right Here, Right Now,” Bjarne Melgaard’s impressive new exhibition of paintings and drawings at Lars Bohman Gallery in Stockholm, the artist courageously maps out and shares his psyche, conveying an array of mental states, from neurosis to obsession to disappointment. More »

Olafur Eliasson, “Reality Machines”

Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson, Beauty, 1993. Image: Anders Sune Berg.

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson’s exhibition “Reality Machines” serves as both a retrospective, including almost twenty key pieces from across his career, and a successful display of the modernist cohesion between art, architecture, and design. More »

Annika von Hausswolff, solo exhibition

Annika von Hausswolff
Annika von Hausswolff, Because There Is No God, No Good Dog, 2015. Image: Andréhn-Schiptjenko.

Swedish photographer Annika von Hausswolff has a history of ignoring the limitations of her chosen medium. While photographs remain her aesthetic and conceptual bedrock, she has also incorporated sculpture, installation, performance, people, and props into her diverse practice, one that chiefly explores the complexities of the human mind. More »