“The Alien Within”

Christoph Schlingensief
Christoph Schlingensief, Animatograph – Iceland-Edition. (House of Parliament/House of Obsession) Destroy Thingvellir, 2005. Photo: Helene Toresdotter.

“The Alien Within” concerns a complex dialogue around how Western society’s structure is influenced by fear as a normative factor. Emphasizing an unstable European political climate, it raises specific questions such as whether creatives are now expected to tackle sociopolitical issues directly or how fear and paranoia exist in growing multicultural sites, such as Malmö, in part due to fluctuating demographics.

The exhibition includes works such as Christoph Schlingensief’s Animatograph—Iceland-Edition. (House of Parliament/House of Obsession) Destroy Thingvellir, 2005, a multimedia installation that blurs the line between art and theater. Its kinetic antics interrogate the apparatus of performance in specific environs, as well as the politics of the bizarre: What gestures are deemed mainstream versus maverick? When does society allow room for an outlier element or movement, and when does it reabsorb such entities into muted invisibility?

This show, while dismantling traditional mediums and straightforward narratives, revisualizes Western civilization’s discontents but avoids the tendency to oversimplify. The Malmö- and Berlin-based theater group Institutet exemplifies this via a series of videos from 2014 shown at the opening titled “Monsters Arrive Because They Are Called For. It Was You Who Called!” and via additional performances in collaboration with the pop band LOVAC that highlight an intent to dismantle paradoxes of power, sexuality, and the nuclear family. For instance, one of the videos is a blur of men receiving fellatio, accompanied by an elusive voice-over, while another, Ladainha, 2006, ambivalently shows a man using a ventilation system to slowly inflate a blow-up doll. Speech and its persuasive applications in politics also prove to be a striking component of this exhibition, which weaves in opportunities for the public to be heard during workshops, lectures, and concerts. One is left wondering who or what will speak next—and from what direction.

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“Survival Kit 9”

Andris Eglītis, Laboratory of Poetic Research, 2017. Image: Jacquelyn Davis.

The 9th edition of Survival Kit is orchestrated by a small team of Baltic and Scandinavian curators: Jonatan Habib Engqvist, Solvita Krese and Inga Lāce. All possess a background in organizing independently and within the confines of institutions, which may be their strong point—their fluidity. More »

The 9th Momentum Biennial

Jenna Sutela, Sporulating Paragraph, 2017. Image: Momentum 9.

Momentum 9, taking place in the industrial town of Moss, Norway, is being curated by Ulrika Flink, Ilari Laamanen, Jacob Lillemose, Gunhild Moe, and Jón B.K. Ransu, who together represent the Scandinavian region. With this biennial’s focus on ‘alienation’, the curators joined forces to determine how alien processes and entities are infused in our lives through technological, ecological and social transformations. More »

Klas Eriksson, “Vet din mamma var du e?”

Klas Eriksson
Klas Eriksson, Evidence of Patchwork, 2017. Image: Göteborgs Konsthall.

Swedish artist Klas Eriksson has developed a practice rooted in examining subcultures via works in public spaces and spontaneous performances. With an interest in how power flows and how crowds function, the artist attempts to unpack sociopolitical dynamics using playful tactics. More »

Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »

“Personal”

Dziurlikowska
Magdalena Dziurlikowska, Corona Radiata, 2016. Image: Gotlands Konstmuseum.

Differentiating between public and private spheres can be challenging. This group exhibition focuses on how one might successfully share a subjective experience when most individuals are conditioned to distance themselves from others. More »

Christine Ödlund, “Aether & Einstein”

Christine Ödlund
Christine Ödlund, Urtica Dioica, 2013. Image: Magasin III.

In a delicate fusion of scientific experimentation, metaphysics, and exchange between human beings and plants, Swedish artist Christine Ödlund provides an enchanting display of paintings, drawings, videos, and an organic installation that entices viewers to reconsider their relationships with both secular and spiritual realms. More »

Max Ronnersjö, Untitled (% work)

Max Ronnersjö
Max Ronnersjö, Untitled, 2014. Image: Max Ronnersjö

A Symbol Is As a Symbol Does

Now hangs Swedish artist Max Ronnersjö’s large-scale, percent (%) painting in my apartment—as if one shops for ½ priced boots or a practical winter coat this spring. More »