“Young Pioneers”

bley-1
Ragna Bley, With Bancroft on Taha’a, 2014.

A group exhibition curated by Elisabeth Byre, “Young Pioneers” exhibits a diverse array of new art from Oslo-based artists who reinforce the notion that the progressive city demands more attention in the face of being usurped in international standing by others cities that are equally forward-thinking and conscientious.

In conjunction with Oslo’s multiple current initiatives revolving around brand-management strategies, the Kunsthall and other organizations have been invited to collectively respond by showcasing the city’s emerging and fresh talent of tomorrow.

The works presented in the exhibition examine this theme utilizing a range of mediums including architecture, sculpture, video, archival photographs, and even documentation of the Norwegian Communist Youth, locally known as the Unge Pionerer. Many works harbor a raw energy and edgy determination to dominate or push themselves into one’s view, such as in Kjell Varvin’s royal-blue sculpture Unstable Variable 29th April 2015, 2015, which consists of an angular standing design enforcing its own logic. The structure is seemingly imbalanced yet manages to gracefully hold attention with its domineering stance. Another enticing work on display is Benjamin Alexander Huseby’s black-and-white C-print diptych The Stuntwoman I & II, 2014, which depicts the Dutch stuntwoman Vanessa Wieduwilt in the midst of either jumping from a high-rise or dangerously hanging from one. This visual dichotomy draws attention to an existing tension present in Oslo’s youth, a reminder that one can either choose to move forward into the future or sheepishly resign oneself to a well-trodden path.

To see the review in context, click here.

Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art (RIBOCA1)

Aslan Gaisumov
Aslan Gaisumov, People of No Consequence, 2016.

For the first Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art, curator Katarina Gregos has chosen to view Latvia as ‘the center of the world,’ where other regions and nationalities become satellites. This is refreshing, for the Baltics have previously been considered to have a peripheral status. More »

Johannes Heldén, “The Exploding Book”

Johannes Heldén
Johannes Heldén, Clouds, 2017.

As one enters the space temporarily designated for Swedish artist and poet Johannes Heldén’s The Exploding Book at Konstakademin’s in Stockholm, one detects that Heldén is receptive to nuance; each creative gesture confirms his dedication to both text and image, expressed with equitable consideration. More »

Malin Gabriella Nordin, “Floating from Within”

Malin Gabriella Nordin, Veil of Dreams, 2017. Image: Gallery Steinsland Berliner.

Stockholm-based artist Malin Gabriella Nordin is one of many Swedish women artists who resort to the basics – or perhaps the old ways, meaning they’re not particularly interested in the digital. More »

“Survival Kit 9”

Andris Eglītis, Laboratory of Poetic Research, 2017. Image: Jacquelyn Davis.

The 9th edition of Survival Kit is orchestrated by a small team of Baltic and Scandinavian curators: Jonatan Habib Engqvist, Solvita Krese and Inga Lāce. All possess a background in organizing independently and within the confines of institutions, which may be their strong point—their fluidity. More »

The 9th Momentum Biennial

Jenna Sutela, Sporulating Paragraph, 2017. Image: Momentum 9.

Momentum 9, taking place in the industrial town of Moss, Norway, is being curated by Ulrika Flink, Ilari Laamanen, Jacob Lillemose, Gunhild Moe, and Jón B.K. Ransu, who together represent the Scandinavian region. With this biennial’s focus on ‘alienation’, the curators joined forces to determine how alien processes and entities are infused in our lives through technological, ecological and social transformations. More »

Klas Eriksson, “Vet din mamma var du e?”

Klas Eriksson
Klas Eriksson, Evidence of Patchwork, 2017. Image: Göteborgs Konsthall.

Swedish artist Klas Eriksson has developed a practice rooted in examining subcultures via works in public spaces and spontaneous performances. With an interest in how power flows and how crowds function, the artist attempts to unpack sociopolitical dynamics using playful tactics. More »

Lovisa Ringborg, “Night Remains”

Lovisa Ringborg
Lovisa Ringborg, Fountain, 2017. Image: Cecilia Hillström Gallery.

In Lovisa Ringborg’s second exhibition at this gallery, the artist upholds the argument that displaying a set of harmonious works can be more potent than a plethora of free-floating entities. More »

Przemek Pyszczek, “1989”

Przemek Pyszczek
Przemek Pyszczek, Public Relief No 6, 2016. Image: Gallery Belenius.

Polish-born, Canadian-raised, Berlin-based artist Przemek Pyszczek displays new works which are primarily sculptural and mixed media, with stints into collage. More »

Ulf Rollof, “Kleptomaniac”

Ulf Rollof
Ulf Rollof, Hungry Stranded, 2016. Image: CFHILL.

Sequestered above the restaurant Nosh & Chow in Stockholm (designed by Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán), renowned Swedish artist Ulf Rollof’s current solo exhibition is the last installment in a trilogy that began in Mexico City. More »